What’s a Literary Tourist to do in Hawaii?

Ihad pretty well resigned myself to lounging by the pool with a good book and a cold Heineken, before I decided to check the Internet. Hawaii, I assumed, was going to be a Literary Tourist wasteland, a jungle of non-literary vegetation.

But I was wrong. Here we were in the middle of what seemed like nowhere (the town of Kona on the Big Island), and I find this great big warehouse of a used bookstore right around the corner. Kona Bay Books offers two miles worth of books. Not first editions, but a good selection of readable novels and non-fiction, many perfect for the beach. Plus there’s a sister store, Hilo Bay Books, on the opposite side of the island.

So off we went on a scenic two hour drive to see how the other half lives, and of course, to check out the books. Along the way we encounter purple flowering Jacaronda trees

next to the complementarily coloured mock orange, nestled, as they are, between these cool cone-shaped mounds (known as Puu Oo)

and fields of dark, healthy-looking lava.

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“Purchases are wrapped in brown paper and tied with string”

The next time you’re in Oamaru, New Zealand you should drop in here:

“Established in 1995, Slightly Foxed Secondhand Books sells good quality books on all subjects including New Zealand local history, modern first editions, fishing, hunting, mountaineering, literature and fiction, history, military, craft and biography.

The shop is located in an Oamaru stone building providing a Victorian style atmosphere with stone walls, wooden floor, sash windows, sofas, tables and chairs and a pot belly stove.

Prices range from $3 to $1500, and the books from recently published to antiquarian, from common-place to rare and collectible.

The proprietors, Jenny Lynch-Blosse and Kahren Thompson, wear Victorian clothing and sales are entered into a spring-back ledger with a fountain pen. Purchases are wrapped in brown paper and tied with string.”

Once you’ve roped up your books, you might want to stroll several doors down for a chat with

Michael O’Brien, If you hit if off you can stay at his place, or take a bookbinding workshop. As he puts it, “I offer a small self-contained studio, adjacent to main house. Separate kitchen and bathroom. Beautifully restored, cosy and warm. French doors open out to a small garden with a fire pit. Main garden is based on permaculture design, with two chickens providing fresh eggs. Private and quiet. I am not always at home, and there is one pussycat onsite. This is ideal for a couple who wish to come to one of my weekend workshops.”

For details on how to flesh out your visit, click here.