Literary San Francisco redux

San Franscisco street car

We were greeted by yet another glorious bright, sunny day.  San Francisco looked spectacular. So what did we do? We ventured forth and – went inside.  Despite the beautiful day,  the draw of City Lights Bookstore 

proved too much. We had to go in.  The iconic shop was established in 1953 by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti; two years later he started publishing books. Both the store and the publishing house gained notoriety after the obscenity trial that Lawrence faced for publishing Allen Ginsberg’s landmark collection Howl and Other Poems (City Lights, 1956). Today in the store you’ll find an eclectic mix of world literature, some Chapbooks, a wall dedicated to the City Lights imprint (including the 50th Anniversary edition of Frank O’Hara’s Lunch Poems), and a curated selection of book entitled Pedagogies of Resistance. Here’s the list. Plus, there’s a special room upstairs

just for poetry.

Though a tad early for a drink, I did at least skid through the Vesuvio Cafe

next door, where Kerouac, Ginsberg and some of the other Beats used to hang out. Vesuvio, in case you were wondering, is open every day of the year. And, if that sign isn’t titillating enough, across the road there’s a strip club

(yes, there’s Continue reading “Literary San Francisco redux”