Visit the Cary Graphic Arts Collection in Rochester, New York

Location: Rochester Institute of Technology
Author(s): Frederick Ghoudy, Ismar David, Hermann Zapf.
Hours: Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–12 p.m., 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Other times by appointment
Focus: Book Design, Graphic Design, Typeface Design, Bookbinding, printer’s manuals, typography, typeface specimens, calligraphy, great books of the printer’s art
Terms: A call ahead is preferred

The Cary Collection is one of the U.S.’s premier libraries on graphic communication history and practices. The original collection of 2,300 volumes was assembled by the New York City businessman Melbert B. Cary, Jr. during the 1920s and 1930s. Cary was director of Continental Type Founders Association (a type-importing agency), a former president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, and proprietor of the private Press of the Woolly Whale.  His professional and personal interests in printing led him to collect printer’s manuals and type specimens, as well as great books of the printer’s art.  In 1969, the Cary Collection was presented to RIT by the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust as a memorial to Mr. Cary, together with funds to support the use and growth of the collection. Today the library houses some 40,000 volumes and a growing number of manuscripts and correspondence collections.

While the collection’s original strengths continue to be an important focus, other aspects of graphic arts history have also been developed. For example, the Cary Collection is committed to building comprehensive primary and secondary resources on the development of the alphabet and writing systems, early book formats and manuscripts, calligraphy, the development of typefaces and their manufacturing technologies, the history and practice of papermaking, typography and book design, printing and illustration processes, bookbinding, posters, and artists’ books.

Though many of the volumes in the library are rare, the Cary Collection has maintained, from the beginning, a policy of liberal access for all students and especially those enrolled in the RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences.

The Cary Collection also manages the Graphic Design Archive, comprised of some 36 archives documenting the work of important 20th-century Modernist graphic designers, and has been aggressively acquiring examples of avant-garde book typography.

Fancy a Poldark pilgrimage?

If you’re a fan of Poldark, the series of historical novels by Winston Graham (published from 1945 to 1953 and continued from 1973 to 2002),  and/or the subsequent BBC telly series, you’ll enjoy this gorgeous spread of photos highlighting various real-life Cornwall locations that are featured in the books and on the screen. There’s also a book, also written by Graham that you can buy: a  lavishly illustrated companion to the novels that was reissued to coincide with the TV show. (If you’re interested in the faithfulness of the TV series to the books, or the books to the reality, you might like to read this intriguing take on the topic).

If this isn’t enough,  Visit Cornwall has a map, and some typically lush travel lingo to go with it that encourages us to “Go behind the scenes and discover the glistening blue waters, lush countryside and craggy cliffs that have sashayed from the background to become the lead Poldark star across the first three series. We think they’re even better in real-life than they are on screen!”

Hungry for more? Try The Poldark Cookery Book, wherein you’ll find a recipe for one of my very favourite dishes:  the cornish pasty ( be sure to enjoy with a pint of West Country cider!). The cookbook is “filled with the food that would have been enjoyed by Ross Poldark and Demelza in the eighteenth century, this recipe book is the perfect present for the Poldark super-fan.”

For more of what you’ll need to know before you go, drop by the Visit Cornwall website. Oh, and if you’re a book collector, there’s currently a set of all twelve first editions available online for US$8500

 

Literary Tourist City Guides

Photo Credit: Chris Wood           Wonder if this streetcar is named desire?

Some years ago Poets and Writers started running a great series of articles detailing literary life in cities throughout the United States. Specifically, “they asked  those in the literary community—authors, booksellers, publishers, editors, and the like—to take us on a tour of their city of residence: to the places they go to connect with writers of the past, to the bars and cafés where today’s authors give readings, and to those sites that are most inspiring for writing.”

This of course describes very well the plight of the literary tourist. Although some of the articles date back to 2011, and thus may be slightly out of date, for the most part these pieces serve as terrific literary ‘City Guides.’ The inside scoop from those in the know.

I plan to visit San Francisco soon and so am particularly interested in reading this. Here’s a link to the whole series. 

I’ve already lined up an interview with Andrew Hoyem, typographer, letterpress printer, publisher, poet, and founder of Arion Press, for my Biblio File podcast. Also plan to talk to someone at The Book Club of California, and am working on Dave Eggers, publisher at McSweeney’s.

Judging from their tourism webside alone, San Francisco is one happening town. Should be a blast!

Audio: Top 10 Literary things for you to do in Houston

Attention Literary Tourists! I met with Kristi Beer from Inprint Houston, a non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring readers and writers in Houston, Texas. Founded in 1983, Inprint fulfills its mission through the nationally renowned Margarett Root Brown Reading Series, the Cool Brains! Reading Series for Young People, and literary and educational activities in the community that demonstrate the value and impact of creative writing, and support of the University of Houston Creative Writing Program. All of this constitutes an important contribution to Houston’s rich and diverse cultural life.

Who better then to question about how the Literary Tourist might best spend his or her time in Houston than someone at the center of this vibrant organization. Listen here to our conversation

Know Before You Go

Visit Houston has a great website filled with useful information about accommodation and cultural activities taking place in the city. You’ll also find special ticket rates and admission offers to Houston’s most sought after museums, theaters and art galleries.

[Please note that this interview was conducted several years ago, so check the Inprint website for information on current and upcoming events etc.]

You can visit Printing Museums around the World

Houston’s Museum of Printing History was founded in 1979 by Raoul Beasley, Vernon P. Hearn, Don Piercy, and J. V. Burnham, four printers with a passion for preserving their various printing-related collections and sharing them with the community. Chartered in 1981 the Museum had its official opening in 1982 with Dr. Hans Halaby, Director of the Gutenberg Museum in Mainz, Germany, cutting the ribbon. The mission of the Museum is to promote, preserve, and share the knowledge of printed communication and art as the greatest contributors to the development of the civilized world and the continuing advancement of freedom and literacy. It does this through an active, on-going exhibitions program, and a series of book arts workshops (The museum suffered a fire a year or two ago, but it appears that things are now back to normal).

I met with Museum Curator Amanda Stevenson to talk about the collection. During our conversation she delivers a very informative thumb-nail sketch of how relief and intaglio printing techniques work. Listen here

More recently I visited the tiny Musee de la Typographie in Tours, France. While it may be small, it’s full of all sorts of different kinds of old printing equipment and tools, typefaces, woodcuts and handmade paper. The owner/manager is incredibly enthusiastic about the enterprise. Muriel Méchin lovingly toured me through his museum, showing me, among other things, a compositor tool called a Moule à Arçon a hand-held individual character casting device that was a forerunner of the Monotype machine. He actually let me handle some of the exhibited items, something most museums forbid. Here’s my conversation with Jean Louis Maitre.

Printing museums, big and small, definitely rank high on many Literary Tourists’ ‘to do’ lists. Here’s a list of some you’ll find, mostly in Europe. And another that covers the rest of the world.